Timbre

Sounds may be generally characterized by pitch, loudness, and quality. Sound "quality" or "timbre" describes those characteristics of sound which allow the ear to distinguish sounds which have the same pitch and loudness. Timbre is then a general term for the distinguishable characteristics of a tone. Timbre is mainly determined by the harmonic content of a sound and the dynamic characteristics of the sound such as vibrato and the attack-decay envelope of the sound.

Some investigators report that it takes a duration of about 60 ms to recognize the timbre of a tone, and that any tone shorter than about 4 ms is perceived as an atonal click. It is suggested that it takes about a 4 dB change in mid or high harmonics to be perceived as a change in timbre, whereas about 10 dB of change in one of the lower harmonics is required.

Index

Hearing concepts

Reference
Winckell
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Harmonic Content

The primary contributers to the quality or timbre of the sound of a musical instrument are harmonic content, attack and decay, and vibrato. For sustained tones, the most important of these is the harmonic content, the number and relative intensity of the upper harmonics present in the sound.

Some musical sound sources have overtones which are not harmonics of the fundamental. While there is some efficiency in characterizing such sources in terms of their overtones, it is always possible to characterize a periodic waveform in terms of harmonics - such an analysis is called Fourier analysis. It is common practice to characterize a sound waveform by the spectrum of harmonics necessary to reproduce the observed waveform.

The recognition of different vowel sounds of the human voice is largely accomplished by analysis of the harmonic content by the inner ear. Their distinctly different quality is attributed to vocal formants, frequency ranges where the harmonics are enhanced.

Geometric waves
Index

Loudness concepts

Hearing concepts
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Attack and Decay

The primary contributers to the quality or timbre of the sound of a musical instrument are harmonic content, attack and decay, and vibrato.

Index

Hearing concepts
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Vibrato/Tremolo

The primary contributers to the quality or timbre of the sound of a musical instrument are harmonic content, attack and decay, and vibrato. The ordinary definition of vibrato is "periodic changes in the pitch of the tone", and the term tremolo is used to indicate periodic changes in the amplitude or loudness of the tone. So vibrato could be called FM (frequency modulation) and tremolo could be called AM (amplitude modulation) of the tone. Actually, in the voice or the sound of a musical instrument both are usually present to some extent.

Vibrato is considered to be a desirable characteristic of the human voice if it is not excessive. It can be used for expression and adds a richness to the voice. If the harmonic content of a sustained sound from a voice or wind instrument is reproduced precisely, the ear can readily detect the difference in timbre because of the absence of vibrato. More realistic synthesized tones will add some type of vibrato and/or tremolo to produce a more realistic tone.

Index

Hearing concepts

References
Rossing, Science of Sound

Backus

Zwicker, et al.
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